#February2021Review3

Today’s review is for Everything That Burns by Gita Trelease.

This book was just beautiful and magical.  I loved seeing the growth of the characters, especially Camille.  I also loved seeing Camille and Lazare’s relationship develop and Sophie come into her own with her dress shop.  Everything That Burns takes place during the French Revolution where magic is persecuted.  Speaking of magic, Camille, who no longer wants to do magic, uses it unintentionally when printing pamphlets using her father’s old printing press to tell the stories of a group of girls that she meets called The Lost Girls.  The Lost Girls were an intriguing group of characters, each with their own special talent.  I loved reading about The Lost Girls and their stories.  I loved how the story ended, it wasn’t rushed and everything came together nicely.  I can’t wait to read more from this author. 

#February2021Review2

Today’s review is for Across the Green Grass Fields by Seanan McGuire.

Yet another masterpiece in the Wayward Children Series.  McGuire created such a unique world with this book with Centaurs, Unicorns, Kelpies, and other mythical creatures.  As for the characters, I loved Regan and the Centaur herd that found her when she went through the door.  Regan’s friendship with Chicory, one of the Centaurs was so pure and heartwarming.  While reading, I found myself being able to relate to Regan just wanting to belong with a group of friends.  I also found that I could relate to Heather too, feeling unaccepted because she liked different things than the other girls.  Across the Green Grass Fields is very much a unique character-driven story, and I loved it.  I can’t wait to read Where the Drowned Girls Go.

#February2021Review1

Today’s review is for Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho.

If you haven’t watched Emmanuel’s video series of the same name as the book, I highly suggest you do.  Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man is a book that you need to take your time reading, so you can fully digest the information.  While a lot is unpacked, the book is very readable and accessible, meaning that young adults could read this book. There is a lot of important history that I never knew.  Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man touches on the importance of language, context, and origins.  The book also discusses enslavement, how racism is a virus, white privilege, implicit bias, and how reverse racism doesn’t exist.  I learned so much from reading Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man, it’s such an important book that needs to be read.

#January2021Review4

Today’s book review is for The Dark Archive by Genevieve Cogman. It is the seventh book in The Invisible Library Series.

I was very happy when I found out that the eighth book of this series is in the works because the epilogue of this book left me wicked confused.  Other than the confusing epilogue, I enjoyed this book.  I loved seeing Irene and Kai’s relationship develop more, and I loved seeing how the dynamic of Catherine as Irene’s apprentice played out.  Speaking of Catherine, I loved her as a character, and how flawed she is, I also loved how she knew exactly what she wanted, and as the story went on how she matured and developed.  I can’t wait to read more from this series, which has become one of my favorites.

#January2021BookReview3

Today’s review is for D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Edgar Porin D’Aulaire.

I wish I had read this book before reading Percy Jackson.  After reading this, I have a much deeper appreciation for the myths of Ancient Greece.  This book is a masterpiece and should be read by anyone interested in Greek Mythology.  I think this book is a great springboard to do further research into some of the stories, and then reading the classics from which some of the myths are drawn, like the story of Jason in his search for the Golden Fleece which is a classic myth written by Apollonius of Rhodes.  I thoroughly enjoyed reading this.

#January2021BookReview2

Today’s review is for Shiny Broken Pieces by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle ClaytonShiny Broken Pieces is the sequel to Tiny Pretty Things.

*CW: Racism, Bullying, Eating Disorders, Self Harm, Drug Use

This was a great ending to the duology. I loved seeing how much the characters had changed between Tiny Pretty Things and this book, especially GiGi. I also loved how much Bette was invested in figuring out what really happened to GiGi and who really did it. The ending wasn’t rushed, and each character’s arc along with the whole story was wrapped up very nicely.

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Today’s book review is for Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle Clayton.

CW: bullying, eating disorders, drug use, alcoholism

This book is filled with drama and it was entertaining. It was also dark and gritty, and I really enjoyed that aspect. I loved how diverse the cast of characters are in this book. This book was so different than anything that I have ever read and I enjoyed it.

#May2020BookReview3

Review

Today’s book review will be for The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen.  This review can also be found on Goodreads.

This is the first Sarah Dessen book I’ve ever read and I absolutely loved it. It’s the perfect book for summer. I loved the story, and I especially love how Emma Saylor wanted to learn more about her mother. I also really loved how this book was family-centered, and I loved all the relationships. Another thing that I loved about this book is how Emma grew as a person. This was a book that I really enjoyed reading.

#May2020BookReview2

Review

Today’s review is for Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo.  This review can also be found on Goodreads.

CW: Death, sexual assault, stalking

I absolutely loved this book and how it was written in verse, I also loved the diversity. This book was heartbreaking but hopeful. There are some powerful quotes in Clap When You Land, one of my favorite quotes is “…a queen is both: deadly & graceful. Poised & ruthless. Quiet & cunning.” Another one of my favorites is “A queen offers her hand to be kissed, & can form it into a fish while smiling the whole damn time.” This book is a book that needs to be read, it’s emotional, important, and while I am not represented in this book I felt the authenticity.

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Review

Today’s review is for The Love That Split the World by Emily Henry.  This review can also be found on Goodreads.

This book was confusing as all hell, but I loved it. I loved how Natalie wanted to know where she was from and how she wanted to learn more about her culture. There were some very relatable things in this book, like feeling you don’t fit in and don’t belong. I also loved Natalie and Beau’s relationship and thought it was well developed. What was confusing was the time travel aspect of the book, it was definitely unique but could have been developed in a way that wasn’t so confusing. Overall, I did enjoy this book.